Holt Antiques at
Walsingham Mill
The Old Mill
Cokers Hill
Little Walsingham
Norfolk
NR22 6BN
England

Purveyors of quality original antique 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Century oak and country furniture, fine art and decorative period items

Opening Times: see news below

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07551 383897

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01328 821763


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News

04/10/20 - An Important Update Regarding Coronavirus (Covid-19) 4th October 2020

Holt Antique Furniture Ltd and its related Companies would like to update you on what's happening at our antiques store “Holt Antiques at Walsingham Mill” with the continued threat of Coronavirus (Covid-19).

Dear Customers...

As you are probably aware, the Coronavirus outbreak has caused unprecedented turmoil to the retail shop / High Street sector since 23rd March 2020 with all non-essential shops being forced to close. The UK Government took the decision to allow this sector which, includes Antiques Stores, to re-open from 15th June 2020, but only if we are able to meet specified criteria set out in the "COVID 19 HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES". 
 
We must act responsibly during this challenging period, to ensure that the safety and wellbeing of both our staff and customers continues.

With the above in mind, we have had to make the difficult decision to keep our store at Walsingham closed for the time being to the general public until further notice

MUCH OF OUR STOCK IS AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE VIA OUR WEBSITE (WITH NEW STOCK ADDED WEEKLY) where we are committed to maintaining our outstanding level of service. Please see:

www.holtantiquefurniture.com

The Management Team at Holt Antiques would like to thank every one of you for your continued support during this time.

Robin Dunkley

Managing Director, Holt Antique Furniture Ltd

19thC Welsh Antique Workhouse Item - Mid 19th Century Welsh Antique Scumble-Painted Pine Box, The Front Bearing The Name "Llanbedr Ruthin Union"

  • Reference : 5374
  • Availability : Available Now
  • Dimensions : Width 31" x Depth 15 3/4" x Height 15"
  • Price : £795

Information

A mid 19th Century Welsh antique scumble-painted pine box, the front bearing the name "Llanbedr Ruthin Union".

Of six-plank nailed construction, the lid lifts to reveal an interior void of any fittings. With applied moulding at its base.

It is our understanding that this was originally owned by and located in the Workhouse detailed below:

Ruthin Union Workhouse (see last image for a picture of the Workhouse):

Ruthin Union Workhouse which was erected in 1838 at the North side of Llanrhydd Street to the East of Ruthin, Wales. The Poor Law Commissioners authorised an expenditure of £6,050 for construction of the building and it was designed to accomodate 200 inmates.

The design of the workhouse followed the familiar "cruciform" pattern with separate accomodation wings for the different classes radiating out from a central hub, where the master and matron's quarters were located.

Ruthin Poor Law Union was originally formed on 1st March 1837, its operation overseen by an elected Board of 24 Guardians, representing the 21 constituent parishes of Aberchwiler, Clocaenog, Derwen, Efenechtyd, Gyffylliog, Llanarmon-yn-Iâl, Llanbedr Dyffryn Clwyd, Llandegla, Llandyrnog, Llanelidan, Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd, Llanferres, Llanfwrog, Llangwyfan, Llangynhafal, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch, Llan-rhudd, Llanychan, Llanynys, Nantglyn and Ruthin. The Board of Guardians responsible for the Union had other duties, including the registration of births, marriages and deaths, vaccinations, assessments of rates, sanitation, school attendance and infant life protection.

The population reached 16,019 within the Union in 1831 with Parish populations ranging from 97 in Llanrhydd to 2066 in Llanhaidar, Kinmerch. The annual poor-rate expenditure for the period 1834-1836 had been £10,005 or 12s.6d. per head of population.

There were 20 long-term workhouse inmates recorded in Ruthin Union, Denbighshire, 1861, with 6 to 13 years residency recorded. Illnesses ranged from insanity, rheumatism, two illegitimate children, paralysis and loss of one arm, old age, loss of both eyes, cripple and old age and debility with the inmates recoded

By the Local Government Act 1929, Unions were abolished and their duties transferred to County Councils, responsibility for the poor being transferred to the Public Assistance Committee until 1948.

The building was taken over in 1930 by Denbighshire County Council and was redesignated as a Public Assistance Institution, known as Rhyddfan. It continued as an old people's home until its closure and demolition in the late 1960's. The site is now a school sports' field.

Very few Ruthin workhouse records have survived.

Condition of the box - The plank lid of the box has been replaced historically. The hinges have been re-attached by the addition of later screws. The lock is missing. This is a lovely item which offers a connection with Welsh poor law history and should be returned to the area from where it originated.

 

We ship worldwide & buy with confidence too!


We are a member of the following 3 Professional Institutions:


1. LAPADA (London and Provincial Antique Dealers Association) -  LAPADA is the UK’s largest trade association for professional art & antique dealers (representing approximately 500 UK dealer members). All items are backed by our LAPADA guarantee.

 

2. CINOA - CINOA is the world association of Art & Antique dealer associations (representing 5000 dealers from 32 associations in 22 countries).

 

3. The Norfolk & Suffolk Antique Dealers Association.


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