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Walsingham Mill
The Old Mill
Cokers Hill
Little Walsingham
Norfolk
NR22 6BN
England

Purveyors of quality original antique 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Century oak and country furniture, fine art and decorative period items

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01328 821763


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17/03/19 - OPENING HOURS FOR THE MILL FOR WEEK COMMENCING 17/3/2018

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Exceptionally Rare Early 19th Century Dutch Antique Delftware Punchbowl Commemorating the Death of Lord Nelson, circa 1805

  • Reference : 4932
  • Availability : On Hold
  • Dimensions : Approx 11" in diameter
  • Price : ¬£On Hold

Information

A rare and impressive early 19thC Dutch-made antique delftware punchbowl, circa 1805.

In typical underglaze blue, the interior of the bowl decorated with a head and shoulders portrait of Lord Horatio Nelson entitled "In Memory of Lord Nelson" flanked eitherside with flowers and foliage. The exterior surface of the bowl also decorated with flowers and foliage.

The base of the bowl bears a makers/decorators mark (not yet identified).

Condition - typical crazing to the tin-glaze but stable. Two minor hairline cracks but again stable.  No rim frits.  This bowl displays very well and is a worthy addition to any Nelson or maritime collection.

About Nelson - one of Norfolk's finest men!

Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronté, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy. He was noted for his inspirational leadership, grasp of strategy, and unconventional tactics, which together resulted in a number of decisive British naval victories, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars. He was wounded several times in combat, losing the sight in one eye in Corsica and most of one arm in the unsuccessful attempt to conquer Santa Cruz de Tenerife. He was shot and killed during his final victory at the Battle of Trafalgar near the port city of Cádiz in 1805.

Nelson was born into a moderately prosperous Norfolk family and joined the navy through the influence of his uncle, Maurice Suckling, a high-ranking naval officer himself. He rose rapidly through the ranks and served with leading naval commanders of the period before obtaining his own command in 1778. He developed a reputation in the service through his personal valour and firm grasp of tactics but suffered periods of illness and unemployment after the end of the American War of Independence. The outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars allowed Nelson to return to service, where he was particularly active in the Mediterranean. He fought in several minor engagements off Toulon and was important in the capture of Corsica and subsequent diplomatic duties with the Italian states. In 1797, he distinguished himself while in command of HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent.

Shortly after the battle, Nelson took part in the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, where his attack was defeated and he was badly wounded, losing his right arm, and was forced to return to England to recuperate. The following year, he won a decisive victory over the French at the Battle of the Nile and remained in the Mediterranean to support the Kingdom of Naples against a French invasion. In 1801, he was dispatched to the Baltic and won another victory, this time over the Danes at the Battle of Copenhagen. He subsequently commanded the blockade of the French and Spanish fleets at Toulon and, after their escape, chased them to the West Indies and back but failed to bring them to battle. After a brief return to England, he took over the Cádiz blockade in 1805. On 21 October 1805, the Franco-Spanish fleet came out of port, and Nelson's fleet engaged them at the Battle of Trafalgar. The battle was Britain's greatest naval victory, but during the action, Nelson, aboard HMS Victory, was fatally wounded by a French sharpshooter. His body was brought back to England where he was accorded a state funeral.

Nelson's death at Trafalgar secured his position as one of Britain's most heroic figures. The significance of the victory and his death during the battle led to his signal, "England expects that every man will do his duty", being regularly quoted, paraphrased and referenced up to the modern day. Numerous monuments, including Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square, London, and the Nelson Monument in Edinburgh, have been created in his memory and his legacy remains highly influential.

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